Wednesday, April 23, 2014 | 12:09:23 PM
Home | About Us | Privacy Policy | Editorial | Contact Us | Feedback | Anonymous Tip | Advertise | In The Press | RSS
Nose for news? Techgoss pays Rs. 1000 for 250-word news items, photos. Anonymity Guaranteed. Email Editor.     
Just GossComment | 

Rich behave badly
By Techgirl

Every Indian has experienced how the rich and powerful in our country think they are a law onto themselves and the normal rules of life do not apply to them.  It’s not much different in the west. Anyone who watched the movie The Social Network would have seen how many people were back stabbed to create Facebook.  The last CEO of Hewlett Packard spent tens of thousands of dollars hiring a woman because he thought he could sleep with her.  One of the biggest names in the Indian BPO industry has had relationships with at least 5 of the women who have worked for him.

It’s now official.  All rich people think the same.  Science magazine has published detailed research which proves that ‘upper classes are more likely to behave dishonorably in every aspect of their life’.


Observers of human nature have long puzzled over the possibility of an ethical class divide. On the one hand, people with fewer resources and dimmer prospects might be expected to do whatever's necessary to get ahead. On the other, wealthy types may be more focused on themselves, because money, independence, and freedom can insulate people from the plight of others. They may also be less generous: Studies involving money games show that upper-class subjects keep more for themselves, and U.S. surveys find that the rich give a smaller percentage of their income to charity than do the poor.

To see whether dishonesty varies with social class, psychologist Paul Piff of the University of California, Berkeley, and colleagues devised a series of tests, working with groups of 100 to 200 Berkeley undergraduates or adults recruited online.

The team's findings suggest that privilege promotes dishonesty. For example, upper-class subjects were more likely to cheat. After five apparently random rolls of a computerized die for a chance to win an online gift certificate, three times as many upper-class players reported totals higher than 12—even though, unbeknownst to them, the game was rigged so that 12 was the highest possible score.

..


Techgoss note:  Techgirl is a senior Tech journalist who reports on the IT, KPO and KPO Sectors for a leading media house.  In her spare time, she dabbles in satire in her blog techgirltalk.blogspot.com.  Techgirl has been ejected from Twitter for satirizing an Indian Minister.  Her satire blog has links to her Times of India interview detailing her being kicked out of Twitter, and then being invited back.


(2/28/2012)
PrintE-MailDiscussDiggFacebookSaveWrite to Editor
Techgoss Team

Editor: DJ Varma
Email | MSN Messenger

Reporters:
Bala Shah,Nitin Paul,Yasmin Ahmed

Anonymous Tip: Email

Feedback Letters: Email


 
 
Copyright 2010 Techgoss.com
Created by 4CPLUS  
Best Viewed in resolution 1024 x 768 pixels