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Intel prizes awarded
By Tushar S

Jack Andraka, 15, of Crownsville, Md. was awarded first place for his new method to detect pancreatic cancer at this year's Intel International Science and Engineering Fair, a program of Society for Science & the Public. Based on diabetic test paper, Jack created a simple dip-stick sensor to test blood or urine to determine whether or not a patient has early-stage pancreatic cancer. His study resulted in over 90 percent accuracy and showed his patent-pending sensor to be 28 times faster, 28 times less expensive and over 100 times more sensitive than current tests. Jack received the Gordon E. Moore Award, named in honor of Intel co-founder and retired chairman and CEO of $75,000.
 
Two students, Nicholas Schiefer, 17, of Pickering, Ontario, Canada and Ari Dyckovsky, 18, of Leesburg, Va., each received the Intel Foundation Young Scientist Award of $50,000.

Raghavendra Ramachanderan from Bangalore, India won the first place in the category for Chemistry and also the Glenn T. Seaborg Nobel Trip Prize which includes a trip to the Nobel ceremony in Sweden. He also receives a cash prize of $5000.


(Photo: Raghavendra Ramachanderan from Bangalore, India)


(5/21/2012)
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